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Webinar Recording: Knowing To Doing – How To Activate To Change With Jonathan Hassall & Madeline O’Reilly

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Description

With ADHD we often know what to do but still can struggle to make it happen. A great example of this is with procrastination. We can feel very comfortable with the idea of the task, yet find ourselves regularly delaying starting. We will explore why this happens with ADHD and discuss what we can do about it.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identifying the difference between shifting tasks and procrastination
  • Identifying what can interfere with activating to task with ADHD
  • What framework can assist in addressing procrastination with ADHD

Who: Jonathan Hassall & Madeline O’Reilly

Recorded on March 20, 2024

View Jonathan and Madeline’s Promotion of Their Book on Amazon:

Decoding Doing – ADHD Solutions for procrastination

This book offers an explanation of procrastination in the context of ADHD. Procrastination happens when we know we should do something for our benefit but actively avoid or delay doing it. At that moment, the focus is on not doing something rather than figuring out what is getting in the way. It is frustrating and risky, and it has the potential to impact our lives. It can result in failed studies, lost jobs, broken relationships, missed opportunities, and a belief in inevitable failure.

By creating a model for what happens when we act to support our intentions, we are able to decode and address procrastination—and, even better, to understand how to avoid it. We call this model the CIMAA Code. CIMAA is an acronym for the five stages of task achievement in our model: connect, imagine, motivate, act, and achieve.

Purchase Your Copy Here: https://www.amazon.com.au/Decoding-Doing-ADHD-Solutions-Procrastination-ebook/dp/B09M7WY6MH

Find Jonathan and Madeline’s Workshop

Decoding Doing – The Online Program

Procrastination is a common occurrence. For those of us with ADHD it can happen far too often, leaving a sense of shame and failure. Most frustratingly, it feels beyond our control as we chase elusive motivation. Redefining Motivation

The motivation generally experienced for people with ADHD is usually quite different from that of people without ADHD. Creating the drive to do

With ADHD, we usually think the motivation needs to arrive at chance. However we can choose to create a low effort, sustainable motivation when we know how. Understanding how we work

These differences in doing are the result of ADHD. We need to understand not only our ADHD and how it impacts us. Then how it impacts reliable doing! Creating the steps to achieve … with support

By learning a structure to support the organization of doing, we can reliably achieve. We just need a way to organize our attention and feelings (motivation).

Find their workshop here: https://www.connectadhd.com/programs/decoding-doing/

Category:

With ADHD we often know what to do but still can struggle to make it happen. A great example of this is with procrastination. We can feel very comfortable with the idea of the task, yet find ourselves regularly delaying starting. We will explore why this happens with ADHD and discuss what we can do about it.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identifying the difference between shifting tasks and procrastination
  • Identifying what can interfere with activating to task with ADHD
  • What framework can assist in addressing procrastination with ADHD

Who: Jonathan Hassall & Madeline O’Reilly

Biography

Jonathan is an ADHD & Executive Function Coach and director of Connect ADHD Coaching, providing services internationally from Brisbane, Australia. His background includes psychiatric services and as Scientific Advisor for ADHD in the pharmaceutical industry. Jonathan trained as a an ADHD coach through the US 10 years ago and is a regular speaker at national ADHD meetings in Australian and US. He is a board member of ADDA and a published author.

My focus includes the translation of relevant executive function theory to facilitate individuals with ADHD finding and embracing their “neuro-native” state supporting adaptation and realization of potential.

Visit Jonathan’s website at www.connectadhd.com

Madeline O’Reilly is a Clinical Psychologist who has worked with adults with ADHD for over a decade. She enjoys working alongside psychiatrists in the treatment of ADHD and their comorbidities.
Recently, Madeline co-authored a book called ‘Decoding Doing’ with her colleague and friend Jonathan Hassall who is an ADHD Coach. They have now released an online course teaching this content for adults with ADHD.
Madeline has presented at both local and international conferences on ADHD, and she has been quoted in local media in relation to ADHD in women and girls.

Visit Madeline’s website at madelineoreillyclinicalpsychology.com

View Jonathan and Madeline’s Promotion of Their Book on Amazon:

Decoding Doing – ADHD Solutions for procrastination

This book offers an explanation of procrastination in the context of ADHD. Procrastination happens when we know we should do something for our benefit but actively avoid or delay doing it. At that moment, the focus is on not doing something rather than figuring out what is getting in the way. It is frustrating and risky, and it has the potential to impact our lives. It can result in failed studies, lost jobs, broken relationships, missed opportunities, and a belief in inevitable failure.

By creating a model for what happens when we act to support our intentions, we are able to decode and address procrastination—and, even better, to understand how to avoid it. We call this model the CIMAA Code. CIMAA is an acronym for the five stages of task achievement in our model: connect, imagine, motivate, act, and achieve.

Purchase Your Copy Here: https://www.amazon.com.au/Decoding-Doing-ADHD-Solutions-Procrastination-ebook/dp/B09M7WY6MH

Find Jonathan and Madeline’s Workshop

Decoding Doing – The Online Program

Procrastination is a common occurrence. For those of us with ADHD it can happen far too often, leaving a sense of shame and failure. Most frustratingly, it feels beyond our control as we chase elusive motivation. Redefining Motivation

The motivation generally experienced for people with ADHD is usually quite different from that of people without ADHD. Creating the drive to do

With ADHD, we usually think the motivation needs to arrive at chance. However we can choose to create a low effort, sustainable motivation when we know how. Understanding how we work

These differences in doing are the result of ADHD. We need to understand not only our ADHD and how it impacts us. Then how it impacts reliable doing! Creating the steps to achieve … with support

By learning a structure to support the organization of doing, we can reliably achieve. We just need a way to organize our attention and feelings (motivation).

Find their workshop here: https://www.connectadhd.com/programs/decoding-doing/