Message from the Editor: Knowing Is Better

October is a big month for me. It’s ADHD Awareness Month and Breast Cancer Awareness Month, so each October I’m barraged with reminders that I am both a breast cancer survivor and an adult with ADHD. This year, the theme of ADHD Awareness Month is, “Knowing is Better,” and I love it because I’ve found that for me, it’s been true for my ADHD and it’s true for breast cancer. It’s better to know about breast cancer, of course – not knowing puts your very survival at risk. Knowing about my ADHD has made life easier, for me and for the people around me.

Knowing I have ADHD allows me to find tools to help me cope, to arrange for appropriate accommodations at work and even to learn new ways of behaving in social situations. I no longer feel stuck in a life of underachievement and frustration (without really understanding why!) In celebration of ADHD Awareness Month, ADDA is offering TADD Talks. A new 9-minute audio recording by some of the best experts in adult ADHD today can be accessed right here. There’s a brand new recording available every day; we send it out via email, but you can also access it on Facebook and via Twitter.

Each October, ADDA works to spread awareness about ADHD, always keeping in mind that, as Bing Crosby sang, you’ve got to “Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive.” ADHDers don’t get to choose our ADHD quirks, but we can choose to make the most of our ADHD talents. There is so much more to ADHD than driving our family and friends crazy with our ADHD eccentricities (or even just bad driving, as you’ll see in today’s article!)

At 36 as a 5-year breast cancer survivor with ADHD, I’m about as eccentric as you can get. I’m already well aware of both awareness topics that take the forefront in October. But I love that ADDA gives us actual advice to function well as adults with ADHD. And, of course, I love the opportunity to connect with other adults like me, like us.

I invite you to take advantage this October of the 31 brand new opportunities to learn more about our ADHD. When we better understand what makes us different from most people, we can discover ways we can better make our place in the world, and we can understand how we can connect with each other.

Sincerely,

Michelle Teel, Editor

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